If you have a wild game roast left, pull it!

Crockpots are a great way that I like to cook roasts to ensure the meat “falls apart” with minimal effort for an awesome shredded meat that can be doctored up with the barbeque sauce of your liking. There’s nothing like shredding, or as we often see on menus at barbeque restaurants, pulling, perfectly tender meat and piling it on a bun for a filling sandwich.

This recipe can be used with any wild game roast. I opted to use a venison roast. However, you can most certainly try it with any other wild game—pronghorn, elk and oryx would also work well with this recipe.

BBQ Pulled Game Roast

Ingredients:

  • One 3 lb. venison roast, or any other wild game roast you have on hand
  • Water
  • 1 tbsp. of garlic salt
  • 1 tsp. of pepper
  • One jar of barbeque sauce of your taste

Set your cleaned venison roast into your large crockpot and fill with water. Take the time to trim any fat and visible silver skin from the roast before putting in the crockpot. I like to fill the crockpot with water until it’s about two inches (or so) from the top. At this time, make sure the roast will be submerged under water if you were to push it under the water. You may need to cut it in half. I usually will cut it in half when the roast is ¾ of the way cooked.

Add your seasoning to the water and cook on high for approximately six hours. You want the meat to be able to shred apart with two forks when it is cooked. Once the meat is shredded, pick out any obvious pieces of silver skin that were on the inside of the roast and add barbeque sauce of your liking at this time (as much as you would like too).

Slice up some pickles and onions and serve on a bun. Potato salad and beans go well with your barbeque. A nice can of pickled jalapenos can spice things up as well! Serve and enjoy! This should easily feed four people. And remember to take someone into the woods in the future and share your outdoor knowledge.

 

About Storm Usrey

Storm Usrey
Storm Usrey is the Conservation Education Manager for the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.