Spring 2017 – Vol 60 Num 1

April, 2017

  • 13 April

    Restoration of Gila trout

    Laurence D'Alessandro, coldwater fisheries biologist, displays a Gila trout during a recent survey conducted at Willow Creek in the Gila National Forest. Cover: NMDGF photo by Jill Wick, New Mexico Wildlife magazine Spring 2017 Vol60, Num1, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.

    Restoration of Gila trout opens door for anglers It’s been five years since two massive wildfires roared through the Gila Wilderness and surrounding national forest, destroying years of painstaking native trout restoration work. “I was interviewing for this job while everything was burning up,” said Jill Wick, Gila trout biologist …

  • 13 April

    Time to hunt sheds

    Shed hunting is a family-friendly activity that provides an opportunity to spend quality time outdoors. James Gonzales was out with his parents on a shed hunting expedition that resulted in the discovery of shed elk antlers. Photo by Joe Gonzales, New Mexico Wildlife magazine Spring 2017 Vol60, Num1, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.

    Spring is here, it’s time to hunt sheds Spring is a time many hunters put their gear away and begin the painstaking wait for autumn and the arrival of the 2017 hunting season. But hunting season is far from over. For those suffering from cabin fever and ready to enjoy …

  • 13 April

    Bear-resistant dumpsters

    Bob Osborn, assistant chief of private land programs for the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, affixes a “Be Bear Aware” sticker to one of the new bear-resistant dumpsters installed at the Los Alamos Medical Center. NMDGF photo by Zen Mocarski, New Mexico Wildlife magazine Spring 2017 Vol60, Num1, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.

    Bear-resistant dumpsters benefit wildlife, people There is a difference between unintentional and intentional or negligent feeding of wildlife. Unfortunately, the end result is often the same. Bears are notorious for becoming quickly conditioned to human surroundings and habituated to human foods after consuming enticing treats found in garbage. Following such …

  • 13 April

    Mimbres River restoration

    Listed as threatened in 1983, the Chihuahua chub is native to the Mimbres River in New Mexico. Adults are dark on both the head and snout. NMDGF photo, New Mexico Wildlife magazine Spring 2017 Vol60, Num1, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.

    Restoration on Mimbres River expected to help threatened chub The Mimbres River is the only place in the country the threatened Chihuahua chub calls home, and New Mexico Department of Game and Fish biologists are working to make sure they’ll always feel that way. Department personnel recently completed almost $500,000 worth …

  • 13 April

    Rio de los Pinos

    The scenic Rio de Los Pinos Wildlife Management Area, top, in northern New Mexico boasts impressive scenery in a quiet, remote location. NMDGF photos by Karl Moffatt, New Mexico Wildlife magazine Spring 2017 Vol60, Num1, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.

    Improved aquatic habitat expected to improve angling at Rio de los Pinos For years, the remote New Mexico Department of Game and Fish Rio de los Pinos Wildlife Management Area was best known among anglers for its solitude and scenery, not the fishing. That could change now that the department has …

  • 13 April

    GAIN and outdoor enthusiasts

    It is easy to get caught up in the moment watching sandhill cranes standing on a frozen pond at the Bernardo Wildlife Management Area with a picturesque mountain background. NMDGF photo by Zen Mocarski, New Mexico Wildlife magazine Spring 2017 Vol60, Num1, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.

    GAIN changes benefit outdoor enthusiasts The scene is a bit like Jurassic Park, minus the dinosaurs, with eyes wide open, afraid to blink for fear of missing out on a spectacular experience. Faces pressed against the window of a car or eyes peering through binoculars or the viewfinder of a …

  • 13 April

    Pecos bighorn numbers

    While forage is readily available in the Pecos throughout most of the year, bighorn sheep are dependent on wind-blown areas clear of snow during the winter months. Wildlife biologists believe the population should be maintained at approximately 350 animals to avoid a potential die-off from starvation due to a lack of available food. NMDGF photo by Clint Henson, New Mexico Wildlife magazine Spring 2017 Vol60, Num1, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.

    Pecos bighorn numbers are dangerously high There are times when words appear to paint a rosy portrait, but upon closer inspection the painting is found to be a forgery. Such is the case in the Pecos Mountains, where more is not always better. The most recent surveys in the Pecos …

  • 13 April

    Fishing back to Berrendo

    An area of the Berrendo River on the outskirts of Roswell offers a quality angling experience and now sports a parking area that can hold up to 30 vehicles. NMDGF photo by Tyson Sanders, New Mexico Wildlife magazine Spring 2017 Vol60, Num1, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.

    Many partners work together to bring fishing back to Berrendo A red bridge passes over the Berrendo River on Red Bridge Road just north of East 19th Street on the outskirts of Roswell. Nowadays it’s more of an orange bridge from years of weathering. Just east of the bridge is …

  • 13 April

    Turkey vulture

    A pair of turkey vultures rest on a rock at Lake Roberts. With a wingspan of 5 to 6 feet, they are the second-largest bird species in New Mexico, next to eagles. NMDGF photo by Dan Williams, New Mexico Wildlife magazine Spring 2017 Vol60, Num1, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.

    Did you know…? Many people refer to this bird as a buzzard, which is incorrect. The term buzzard in the United States probably is the result of old western movies, but buzzard, in Europe, refers to a member of the buteo, or hawk family. The turkey vulture’s diet consists almost …

  • 13 April

    Ears, not eyes

    Kirsten Cruz-McDonnell, chief biologist for Envirological Services, Inc., walked a predetermined route in the Santa Fe National Forest, stopping at up to 20 points for 10 minutes identifying different bird species primarily by their calls. Photo by Zen Mocarski, New Mexico Wildlife magazine Spring 2017 Vol60, Num1, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.

    Ears, not eyes critical in documenting small birds Walking through the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in the Santa Fe National Forest offers the opportunity to see wildlife diversity. Sometimes, however, seeing isn’t the best option. When trying to identify small birds, there are times it helps to close your eyes, …